Islam: The Misunderstood Religion

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Muhammad Qutb
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 277 | Size: 13.5 MB

Most of us have heard of the Hadith by the Prophet Mohamed (PBUH): “Islam began as something strange and will return to being something strange.” It seems like this Hadith is very relevant to what we are experiencing today. Islam is under the spotlight in the media, news, and debates. Many misunderstandings are arising concerning Islam, especially after September 11, 2001. This book by Muhammad Qutb aims to clear many of these misunderstandings and explain Islam as it really is. Continue reading

The Battle of Qadisiyyah (The Fall of the Mighty Persian Empire)

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Abdul Malik Mujahid
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 109 | Size: 18 MB

The victory of Qadisiyyah heralded the downfall of the Sasanian Dynasty, paved the way for the conquest of Iraq and quickened Islamic expansion into Persia (Iran) and beyond. The Iranians had 240,000 troops, but the Muslims with about 30,000 soldiers still drove the Iranian Empire, one of the superpowers of the day, into the ground. At Al-Qadisiyyah, the Muslims were able to break the Persian might, dealing them a blow from which they would never recover. The Battle of Al-Qadisiyyah is therefore one of the most decisive battles in the history of humanity. Articles Sourced from : Al-Bidaya Wal Al-Nihayah (Ibn Kathir) Seera Amir ul Mu’mineen Caliph Umar Bin al-Khattab (Dr. Al-Sallabi) Al-Muntazam fi Tarikil Muluk wa al-Ummam (Al-Tabari). Continue reading

The Meaning Of Life | Muslim Spoken Word

We spend so much time living life, yet not enough time thinking about what are we doing alive. Ponder over the purpose of life, our existence, who is responsible for our creation and what happens when we leave. If you don’t want to think about where you came from, at least think about where you are going to go when it’s all over.

“Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.”. Continue reading

SYRIA: Shiism Is Killing Us! [Full Documantary] +18

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Documentary

This video is for educational purposes only and simply provides a view of the Syrian people who are literally being butchering by Bathist Assad regime who is ironically backed by the so called regime that claims to support the “oppressed” worldwide. It has some graphic material (it is blured) but nevertheless we put a clear warning in the video title (+18).  Continue reading

The Crusades Through Arab Eyes (Audio Book)

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Amin Maalouf

European and Arab versions of the Crusades have little in common. For Arabs, the twelfth and thirteenth centuries were years of strenuous efforts to repel a brutal and destructive invasion by barbarian hordes. In “The Crusades Through Arab Eyes”, Amin Maalouf has sifted through the works of a score of contemporary Arab chroniclers of the Crusades, eyewitnesses and often participants in the events.

He retells their stories in their own vivacious style, giving us a vivid portrait of a society rent by internal conflicts, and shaken by a traumatic encounter with an alien culture. He retraces two critical centuries of Middle Eastern history, and offers fascinating insights into some of the forces that shape Arab and Islamic consciousness today.

Reviews:

‘A useful and important analysis adding much to existing western histories … worth recommending to George Bush.’ London Review of Books ‘Well-researched and highly readable.’ The Guardian ‘A wide readership should enjoy this vivid narrative of stirring events.’ The Bookseller ‘An inspiring story … Very readable … Well translated … Warmly recommended.’ The Times Literary Supplement ‘Very well done indeed … Should be put in the hands of anyone who asks what lies behind the Middle East’s present conflicts.’ Middle East International

About Author:

Amin Maalouf is a Lebanese writer and journalist. He is the author of bestselling books, including Leo Africanus, Samakand, On Identity and Ports of Call. He has lived in Paris since 1976. Continue reading

The Two Holy Mosques

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Ministry of Islamic Affairs, Endowments, Da‘wah and Guidance
Language:  English | Format: PDF | Pages: 22 | Size: 11 MB

A brief book on the two Holy Mosques in Saudi Arabia, the Holy Mosque in Makkah is the most revered place of worship for Muslims around the world. At the center of the Mosque is the Ka’aba, which literally means ‘cube’ in Arabic. All Muslims are required to face in the direction of the Ka’aba five times every day when offering their prayers. The Prophet’s Mosque in Madinah is the second most revered place of worship for Muslims around the world. Millions of Muslims visit the Mosque each year, to worship, to visit the Prophet’s grave, and to see the city that gave birth to Islam. Continue reading

Al-Qur’an: The Linguistic Miracle

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Linguistic Miracle http://www.linguisticmiracle.com/
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 150 | Size: 2 MB

In the first section of this Book, there is introduction of Classical Arabic (a more in-depth version of the language in comparison to the Modern Fus-ha Standard, Spoken Arabic aka MSA). I will explain the literary tools of Classical Arabic, with examples, and later near the end of this section, I will share a few gems of Classical Arabic language, to give you a feel of how the Classical Arabs expressed themselves through Poetry, and what powerful literary tools they used to convey their message to an equally praiseworthy literary audience. The second section will focus on discussing the subtleties of the Qur’anic text and its beauties, and will further give tips for students of Qur’anic and Arabic language to have the ability themselves to extract beautiful gems from the Qur’an.

Introduction to the Arabic Language:

The Arabic language is a unique language, and has many special and unique features which make it suitable for it to convey; many meanings in few words, subtleties, emphasis and powerful imagery through speech alone. If God was to convey a message to mankind, it would be through a language which is easy to learn, and has the highest form of expressiveness. I believe that Arabic is that language by which He communicated His final Message to mankind, and I will try to prove it through this Book – Qur’an, the Linguistic Miracle.

In the first section of this Book, I will be introducing Classical Arabic (a more in-depth version of the language in comparison to the Modern Fus-ha Standard, Spoken Arabic aka MSA). I will explain the literary tools of Classical Arabic, with examples, and later near the end of this section, I will share a few gems of Classical Arabic language, to give you a feel of how the Classical Arabs expressed themselves through Poetry, and what powerful literary tools they used to convey their message to an equally praiseworthy literary audience.

What is the Arabic language?

Arabic is an ancient Semitic language, believed to be over 2000 years old. So it has had alot of time to develop, and enrich its meanings and linguistic beauty. Some say it – the language- has been inspired and preserved miraculously in its pure form. It has stayed firm and pure to its roots, meaning that words and their meanings which were said over 1,400 years ago are still preserved and documented for us uptill this day. Unlike many other languages where words change meanings every few generations, and the meaning of the original word is lost. An example in the English language today is the word ‘wicked’ which meant ‘evil’ last generation, but in this generation it means ‘good.’ It may be that 2 generations ahead, ‘wicked’ may only be recognized as meaning ‘good’, possibly making future readers of the language confused.

How is Arabic Structured?

Arabic works with a triliteral root system, which means that most words are made of 3 Root Consonant letters, and other 1 and 2 letter words with different meanings surrounding that word. It is then for the reader to use his knowledge of the language to separate and distinguish between the letters to understand which letter means what.

This will be explained later in the book, and is a fun part of learning the language. (Almost like connecting a jigsaw puzzle.)

How does Arabic language work?

Arabic 3 Consonant lettered words are usually ‘Descriptions’. These Descriptions will then fit into Contexts for Objects.

For example; the word ‘sayyaarah’ means ‘Car’. But in reality, it comes from the root meaning of the 3 Root Letters: Siin-Ya-Ra (s-y-r) = Meaning: ‘Travelling through Movement.’

We therefore see that other words like i.e. ‘he went for a walk’ (saara), or “siiyrah” (a walk through a journey), which have similar Root letters have similar meanings, simply due to their Root letters being the same. This makes it extremely easy to know what a word means in Arabic, because you might see a long difficult word, but you break it down to look at its root 3 letters – and voila! You know what root meaning and description is being hinted at. This allows you to visualize the picture being portrayed through the Arabic.

This root system is also found partially in other languages, but Arabic sustains this rule throughout its entire language consistently, which makes its richness even more exciting to explore.

What makes it even more exciting is that the Arabic language has one of the richest sets of Vocabularies in the world, probably more than any other language. (For example: the Arabs have over 1000 words just for describing the Camel, and over 60 different words for Love!) And the amazing bit is – every word has its own shade of meaning, so two words could be similar, but they both would have a slightly different implication in meaning. Continue reading