Tafsir 85: A Commentary On Surah Al-Buruj

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Abu Ameenah Bilal Philips
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 90 | Size: 2 MB

The Qur’an Consists of many lessons and parables for people t obtain lessons and draw strength from. Surah Buruj icontains one of the most beautiful stories of steadfastness and patience in the face of adversity; a universal lesson applicable to all.

A step by step analysis of each verse drawing upon different sources . The author brings out the great relevance of the Quran to our lives and to occurrences/events in the modern world.

Dr Abu Ameenah Bilal Philips was born in Jamaica, but grew up in Canada, where he accepted Islam in 1972. He completed a diploma in Arabic and a B.A. from the College of Islamic Disciplines (Usool ad-Deen) at the Islamic University of Madeenah in 1979. At the University of Riyadh, College of Education, he completed a M.A. in Islamic Theology in 1985, and in the department of Islamic Studies at the University of Wales, he completed a Ph.D. in Islamic Theology in 1994.

Abu Ameenah taught Islamic Education and Arabic in private schools in Riyadh for over ten years and for three years he lectured M.Ed. students in the Islamic Studies department of Shariff Kabunsuan Islamic University in Cotobato City, Mindanao, Philippines. Since 1994 he has founded and directed the Islamic Information Center in Dubai, United Arab Emirates (which is now known as Discover Islam) and the Foreign Literature Department of Dar al Fatah Islamic Press in Sharjah, UAE. Presently, he is a lecturer of Arabic and Islamic Studies at the American University in Dubai and Ajman University in Ajman, UAE. Continue reading

Shamaa-il – Tirmidhi With Commentary (Kasaail-E-Nabawi Sallalahu A’layhi Wasallam)

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Shaykhul Hadith Maulana Muhammad Zakariyya
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 458 | Size: 13.5 MB

Shamaa-il – Tirmidhi With Commentary Kasaail-e-Nabawi Sallalahu A’layhi Wasallam. This is a Commentary on the abridged form of Imam Tirmidhi’s (209 – 279 AH) famous Shamaa-il, in which he has recorded everything about the Holy Propet (S.A.W) on the authority of the Companions, and collected 397 ahadith which are devided into 55 Chapters.  Drawing A pen picture of the Holy Prophet’s (S.A.W) physical features manners and characteristics.

This English translation and commentary is of the Khasaa-il Nabawi Sallallahu ‘Alayhi Wasallam by the late Shaykhul Hadith Maulana Muhammad Zakariyya
It is intented to enable a Muslim to achieve a link and connection with the one whom Allah Ta’aala has made as a mercy unto mankind, and most certainly Allah has spoken the truth when He mentions in His Book:

“Verily, you (0 Muhammad) are of a very high (noble) character”.

Shaikh uk Hadith Maulana Muhammad Zakariyya Kandhelwi writes the following in the Preface to this Book:

“b. Most of the references in this transalation are derived from the following books: ‘Jam’ul Wasaa-il’ of Mulla ‘Ali Qaari Hanafi; ‘Munaawi’ of Shaykh ‘Abdur-Ra-oof Misri; ‘Mawaahib-Ladunniyyah’ of Shaykh Ebrahim  Bayjuri and ‘Tah-dhibut Tah-dhib’ of Haafiz Ibn Hajar ‘Asqalaani.
c. Since the trasalation is meant for the layman, literal meanings have been given . Word for word transalation has been avoided.
d. In addition to the transalation many things have been added to serve as a commentary. This has been written separately after the actual transalation.
e. At many places in the transalation of the ahaadith additional information has been provided.
f. Where there seems to be contradiction between two hadith, the differences have been briefly explained.
g. The view of the different madhaa-hib have been mentioned briefly at places. The Hanafi mahd-dab has been specially mentioned as the majority of the local population (i.e the inhabitants of India ) adhere to this madh-hab.
h. The proof that substantiate the Hanfis madh-hab have been mentioned briefly where deemed necessary.
i. Where a battle or incident is mentioned in a hadith, the battle or incident is described in the commentary.
j. Where the relation of a hadith to a chapter is not obvious, an explanation has been provided.
k. To keep the subject matter brief, with regard to those incidents that have not been narrated herein, the readers have been referred to their original sources. The name of the kittab is given where they can be found in detail so that those who are interested may easily refer to them.
l. Utmost care has been taken to keep the subject under discussion short and precise, as readers may become bored with lengthy discourses.

And divine guidance to me is but from Allah, on Him do I rely and to Him do I return. Continue reading

Concise Commentary On The Book Of Tawhid

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Dr. Salih al Fawzan
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 519 | Size: 22 MB


This book gives a clear explanation of the Muslim sound Creed which is the core of the religion of Islam, as the belief in Tawhid (monotheism) is the purpose for which Allah created both mankind and jinn, and thus, those whose belief in Tawhid is corrupt, are not considered Muslims. It is a commentary on the Book of Tawhid written by Sheikh Muhammad Ibn Abdul Wahhab.

In this book, Dr. Salih al Fawzan has projected light on doctrinal issues of utmost importance in a genuine and reader-friendly style. This translated version of the book fulfills a long-standing need on the part of English-speaking Muslims for a brief, introductory book in Tawhid. It is a valuable book for novice readers, be they Muslims or non-Muslims, who do not have thorough knowledge of the sound creed, The chapters of this book focus on major issues in Tawhid such as the definition of Tawhid, virtue of Tawhid, warning against acts of shirk (polytheism), the Prophet’s Maintenance of monotheism, and other topics.

Dr. Salih al Fawzan (born in 1935) has obtained a PhD in Islamic jurisprudence and has a high profile in teaching jurisprudence. He is a member of many academic institutions including the Board of Senior Ulema, the Permanent Committee for Fatwa and Research. He has written more than sixty published works covering Muslim Creed, Islamic jurisprudence and Muslim’s conduct. Continue reading

The Evolution Of Fiqh – (Islamic Law & Madh-habs)

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Dr. Abu Ameenah Bilal Philips
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 152 | Size: 1 MB

The origin of Islamic law and its evolution and the four schools of law (math-habs) are discussed in this work along with the reasons for differences among them.

This is probably  Bilal Philips best-selling work on the various schools of thought in Islam, including detailed facts, insight, and commentary on the four major madhabs as well as other, less-known madhabs in Islam.

Includes mini-biographies on various eminent Islamic scholars the Evolution of Fiqh (Islamic Law & the Madh-habs), the author very clearly presents a brief overview of the historical development of Islamic law and its schools (the Madh-Nabs).

The book identifies the main reason for the appearance of the Madh-habs and the factors leading to differences among them. For those to whom the Madh-habs have been a mystery, this aspect of the book will he extremely enlightening. Although the author sheds light on both the positive and negative roles of the Madh-habs in the past, the main message of the book is call to the understanding the differences (with an aim to remove them where possible)

About the Author

Dr Abu Ameenah Bilal Philips was born in Jamaica, but grew up in Canada, where he accepted Islam in 1972. He completed a diploma in Arabic and a B.A. from the College of Islamic Disciplines (Usool ad-Deen) at the Islamic University of Madeenah in 1979. At the University of Riyadh, College of Education, he completed a M.A. in Islamic Theology in 1985, and in the department of Islamic Studies at the University of Wales, he completed a Ph.D. in Islamic Theology in 1994.

Abu Ameenah taught Islamic Education and Arabic in private schools in Riyadh for over ten years and for three years he lectured M.Ed. students in the Islamic Studies department of Shariff Kabunsuan Islamic University in Cotobato City, Mindanao, Philippines. Since 1994 he has founded and directed the Islamic Information Center in Dubai, United Arab Emirates (which is now known as Discover Islam) and the Foreign Literature Department of Dar al Fatah Islamic Press in Sharjah, UAE. Presently, he is a lecturer of Arabic and Islamic Studies at the American University in Dubai and Ajman University in Ajman, UAE. Continue reading

The Concept Of God In Islam

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Hasan Abdul Hakim
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 14 | Size: 1 MB

The Concept of God in Islam: There is no God but Allah (SWT). The first part of the Muslim confession of faith (the Shahada) is the basis for the concept of God in Islam. The Muslim bears witness that: “There is no god but God”. or “no divinity but the (one) Divinity”. The revealed Scripture of Islam, the Qur’an, is like a vast commentary on this simple statement, drawing from it all its implications for human life and thought.  This book higlights Islams conception of diety through a concise look at Qur’anic verses and our everyday surroundings. Overall this brief book provides a good introductory guide to a muslims primary belief in God. Continue reading

[Al Ghurabah] Alleviating Grievances In Describing The Condition Of The Strangers

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Ibn Rajab al Hanbali
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 25 | Size: 1 MB

This book is a translation of a short treatise entitled Kashf-ul-Kurbah fee wasfi Hali Ahlil-Ghurbah, or Alleviating Grievances in Describing the Condition of the Strangers, written by the great Imaam, Al- Hafidh Zayn-ud-Deen Ibn Rajab Al-Hanbalee, rahimahullaah. In this treatise, Ibn Rajab deals with the topic of the Strangers, or Al-Ghuraba. He begins by listing the many ahaadeeth reported about them, in which the Messenger of Allah describes their attributes and explains their position. They are given this name because they will be strange during the Last Days, due to their adherence to the Sunnah and to the Way of the First Muslims, the Salaf As-Salih. So just as those who first accepted Islaam at the hands of Muhammad (saws) were considered strangers with their families and close ones, then indeed, those who adhere to the Sunnah in the last Days, when innovations and misguidance are rampant and widespread, will also be considered strangers amidst their families and close ones, not to mention the disbelievers.

The Imam then goes on to explain these ahaadeeth based on various statements from the Salaf. And he categorizes this Strangeness into several types – both inner and outer. It must be noted that Ibn Rajab uses several weak ahaadeeth in this treatise, which have been pointed out. And towards the end of his treatise, he begins to divert from the topic by going deep into the issue of inner strangeness, sometimes focusing on aspects that have no basis in Islaam, such as talk about the ‘Aarif, wajd, khulwah, etc. These were Sufi ideas that were prevalent during his time. Continue reading

The Prophetic Commentary Of The Qur’an

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Shaykh Salman al-Awdah
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 25 | Size: 1 MB

The Qur’ân came to humanity after all the previous revealed scriptures had either been lost or, like the Torah and the Gospel, corrupted. Allah speaks about how people had corrupted the scriptures, saying: “Woe to those who write the Book with their own hands and then say: ‘This is from Allah’ to gain from it a paltry price. So woe to them for what their hands have written and woe to them for what they gain from it.” [Sûrah al-Baqarah:79]. If the Qur’ân is Allah’s greatest blessing upon humanity, it follows that knowledge of the commentary and interpretation of the Qur’ân is the greatest of all knowledge, since it is the knowledge that gives humanity a correct understanding of what Allah is saying to them. This is why scholars throughout history have given this field of study so much attention and have written so extensively about it. The commentary of the Qur’ân began at the time of Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him). Indeed, the Prophet (peace be upon him) is the primary source for explaining Allah’s Book. He explained the meanings of the Qur’ân’s verses by his words and by his deeds. Continue reading

[Jami Ul Uloom Wa’l Hikam] A Collection Of Knowledge And Wisdom

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Ibn Rajab al Hanbali
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 644 | Size: 28 MB

The Compendium of Knowledge and Wisdom is the translation by Abdassamd Clarke of the masterwork of Ibn Rajab al-Hanbali. It is a comprehensive collection of sciences and wisdom in commentary of fifty hadith (Including the ‘Forty’ of Imam An Nawwawi) from the concise comprehensive speech (Jawami’ al-Kalim) of the Messenger of Allah, may Allah bless him and grant him peace.

The author adds another eight hadith to the famous ‘Forty’ Hadith of Imam an-Nawawi and gives a much more elaborate commentary on their chains of transmission, on the rulings that they entail and on the spiritual dimensions of the hadith, their explanations with respect to the verses of the Qur’an and other hadith, and what the great pious predecessors of Islam have said about them. Every hadith is considered by the ‘ulama (scholars) essential for knowledge of the deen. The topics range from the most exacting treatments of the affairs of the shari’ah (Islamic Law) to luminous expositions of the spiritual sciences of Islam.

Best known as Ibn Rajab, his full name and titles are: al-Imam al-Hafiz Abu al-Faraj Zayn al-Din `Abd al-Rahman ibn Ahmad ibn Abd al-Rahman (known as Rajab) ibn al-Hasan ibn Muhammad ibn Abi al-Barakat Mas`ud al-Baghdadi al-Dimashqi al-Hanbali (736-795 AH). Rajab was the nickname of his grandfather Abd al-Rahman, perhaps because he was born in that month.

Born in Baghdad, Ibn Rajab learned much from his father, who himself was a great scholar, then studied in Egypt and Damascus where he settled down until he died. Among his eminent teachers were: Abu al-Fath Muhammad ibn Muhammad ibn Ibrahim al-Maydumi, Muhammad ibn Isma`il al-Khabbaz, Ibrahim ibn Dawud al-`Attar, Abu al-Haram al-Qalanisi, and Imam Ibn Qayyim al-Jawziyyah.

He was a colleague of the famous hadith expert al-Hafiz Abu al-Fadl al-`Iraqi. He devoted himself to the subject until he became an expert in all the sciences related to hadith. He then taught hadith, and fiqh according to Hanbali school, in the Jami` Bani Umayyah and other seats of learning in Damascus. Among his famous students include scholars like Abul-Fadl Ahmad ibn Nasr ibn Ahmad, the mufti of Egypt (d. 844 AH), Abu al-`Abbaas Ahmad ibn Abi Bakr ibn `Ali al-Hanbali (d. 844 AH), Dawud ibn Sulayman al-Mawsili [d. 844 AH]

He was a leading scholar of the Hanbali school. His work al-Qawa`id al-kubra fi al-furu` is clear evidence of his expertise in fiqh, demonstrating an extreme, even exhaustive knowledge of the intricacies of detailed fiqh issues.

He was known for piety, righteousness. His sermons were considered most effective, full of blessing and beneficial. People of all schools were unanimous as to his quality, and the hearts of the people were full of love for him. He did not get involved in any worldly business, nor visited people of material positions.

He wrote: a detailed 20-volume scholarly commentary on the Sunan of al-Trimidhi; a commentary on part of Sahih of al-Bukhari; Dhayl (Supplement) to Tabaqat al-hanabilah; al-Lata`if fi waza`if al-ayyam, Bayan fadl Ilm al-salaf ala al-khalaf.

Among his best known and most referred works is Jami` al-ulum wa al-hikam, the commentary on al-Arba`un (the forty hadiths) of al-Nawawi. He added ten hadiths to the original 40 and commented in detail on all of these fifty hadiths. This commentary discusses all aspects of the hadiths, the chain of narrations, the narrators, and the text.

Hafiz Ibn Hajar al-`Asqalani said of him: “He was a great expert in the sciences of hadith – the historical accounts of narrators, the chains of narration, and meaning of the text.”

(Based on: Ibn Hajar al-`Asqalani, al-Durar al-kaminah, ii. 428, Inba al-ghumr, i. 460; Ibn al-`Imad, Shadharat al-dhahab, vi. 239; `Abd al-Hayy al-Kattani, Fihris al-faharis, ii. 636-7). Continue reading