A Guide for the New Muslim (12 CDs)

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Al-Basheer is proud to introduce a new CD collection from renowned author and Sheikh, Br. Jamaal Zarabozo. The new collection is called A Guide for New Muslims and is one of his best introductions to Islam yet. The collection is also of benefit to those who are looking to revert to Islam, as well as those who are looking for valuable Dawah materials. Br. Jamaal Zarabozo offers his insight and practical guidance to those entering Islam, and answers many frequently asked questions from those new to the religion. These highly recommended CDs will be a good reference material and source of education for you, your family, friends and Dawah practice for time to come and a good addition to your CD/lecture library.

Overview of the series:

CD 1- The Purpose and Goals of the Series
CD 2- The Basic sources of Islam: Quran, Sunnah & Hadith
CD 3- The Universality of Islam and Its Timelessness
CD 4- Testimony of Faith; Islamic Law and Fiqh
CD 5- Special Rewards for the Convert / Issue of Faith and Marriage from Pre-Muslim Days
CD 6- Islamic Creed and The Article of Faith
CD 7- The Ritual Acts & The Five Pillars of Islam
CD 8- The Character, Morals & Relations of The Muslim
CD 9- A Muslims Social Interaction Towards a Spouse
CD 10-A Muslims Social Behavior with Neighbors and Non-Muslims
CD 11-The Social Behavior with the Society as a Muslim
CD 12-Motivating and Increasing Ones Faith

About the Speaker:

SH. Jamaal Zarabozo is a well known Scholar and long time convert to Islam. He is internationally renowned as aspeaker and author of a number of books, including the three-volume Commentary on the Forty Hadith of al-Nawawi, How to Approach and Understand the Quran, Purification of the Soul and others. His other available lecture series include the 28-lecture series A Study of Surah al-Faatihah and 7-Audio Cds of Al-Hasad ( Envy ). Continue reading

Ramadan Mubarak For All Muslims

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We recommend you this category for this holy month: Fasting Ramadaan

The Muslim in Ramadaan

What should we say to the Muslims on the occasion of the beginning of Ramadaan?.

Praise be to Allaah.

Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):

“The month of Ramadan in which was revealed the Qur’aan, a guidance for mankind and clear proofs for the guidance and the criterion (between right and wrong). So whoever of you sights (the crescent on the first night of) the month (of Ramadan i.e. is present at his home), he must observe Sawm (fasts) that month, and whoever is ill or on a journey, the same number [of days which one did not observe Sawm (fasts) must be made up] from other days. Allaah intends for you ease, and He does not want to make things difficult for you. (He wants that you) must complete the same number (of days), and that you must magnify Allaah [i.e. to say Takbeer (Allaahu Akbar: Allaah is the Most Great)] for having guided you so that you may be grateful to Him.”

[al-Baqarah 2:185]

This blessed month is a great opportunity for goodness, barakah (blessing), worship and obedience towards Allaah.

It is a great month, a noble season, a month in which hasanaat (rewards for good deeds) are multiplied and in which committing sayi’aat (bad deeds) is more serious than at other times. The gates of Paradise are opened and the gates of Hell are shut, and the sinners’ repentance to Allaah is accepted. It is a month whose beginning is mercy, its middle is forgiveness and its end is redemption from the Fire.

So give thanks to Him for the season of goodness and blessing that He has bestowed upon you, and for the means of bounty and various kinds of great blessings for which He has singled you out.  Make the most of this blessed time by filling it with acts of worship and forsaking haraam things, so that you may attain a good life in this world and happiness after death.

For the sincere believer, every month is an occasion for worship and his whole life is spent in obeying Allaah, but in the month of Ramadaan he has even more motives to do good and his heart is even more focused on worship, and he turns even more to his Lord. By His grace, our generous Lord bestows His bounty upon the fasting believers and multiplies the reward for them on this blessed occasion, so He gives abundantly and rewards generously for righteous deeds. Continue reading

From The Best Adhan In The World – Muslim Call To Prayer

From The Best Adhan In The World – Muslim Call To Prayer

Azan – The Call For Prayers
In The Name of Allah, Most Gracious, Most Merciful

Adhan is the first call to prayer. The Adhan is uttered in a loud, albeit sweet melodious, voice to announce to the faithful that it is time for the Obligatory Prayer and to invite them to offer the prayers. Those who perform Adhan are known as ‘Muedhin.’ The honour of being the first Muedhin goes to Bilal, a black slave who converted to Islam. He had a very sweet, resonant and musical voice. He was appointed as Muedhin by the Prophet of Islam. The appointment of a black slave as the first person to call Muslims for prayers, shows that in Islam all human beings are treated as equals. Rich or poor, black or white, short or tall – all are equal in the eyes of Allah. It is the piety of each individual that makes the difference.

Adhan is recited in a loud voice by the Muezzin facing the direction of the Ka’ba in the following words, which are said in the order mentioned:

“Allahu Akbar” – recited FOUR times.

Meaning, “Allah is Most Great.”(four times)

“Ash-hadu an la ilaha ill-Allah” – recited TWO times.

Meaning, “I bear witness that there is none worthy of being worshipped except Allah.”(twice)

“Ash-hadu anna Muhammad-ar-Rasoolullah” – recited TWO times.

Meaning, “I bear witness that Muhammad is the Apostle of Allah.”(recited twice)

“Hayya ‘alas-Salah” – recited TWO times.

Meaning, “Come to prayer.”(turning the face alone to the right and saying it twice)

“Hayya ‘alal-falah” – recited TWO times.

Meaning, “Come to Success.”(turning the face alone to the left and saying it twice)

“Allahu Akbar” – recited TWO times.

Meaning, “Allah is Most Great” (face back to front and saying it two times).

Morning (Fajr) Prayers

The following phrase is added after “Hayya ‘alal-falah” in the Azan of the early morning prayers:

“As-salatu khairum minannaum” – recited Two times.

Meaning, “Prayer is better than sleep” (recited two times).

”La ilaha illallah” There is no deity except for Allah.

ALLAH IS THE GREATEST

http://www.theholyquran.org

Quran(2.87) We gave Moses the Book and followed him up with a succession of messengers; We gave Jesus the son of Mary Clear (Signs) and strengthened him with the Holy Spirit. Is it that whenever there comes to you a messenger with what ye yourselves desire not, ye are puffed up with pride?- Some ye called impostors, and others ye slay!

Quran (16.90) Allah commands justice, the doing of good, and given to kith and kin, and He forbids all indecent deeds, and evil and rebellion: He instructs you, that ye may receive admonition.

Quran (2.62) Those who believe (in the Quran), and those who follow the Jewish (scriptures), and the Christians and the Sabians,- any who believe in Allah and the Last Day, and work righteousness, shall have their reward with their Lord; on them shall be no fear, nor shall they grieve.

Quran (2.263) Kind words and the covering of faults are better than charity followed by injury. Allah is free of all wants, and He is Most-Forbearing.

Quran (29.46) And dispute ye not with the People of the Book, except in the best way, unless it be with those of them who do wrong: but say, “We believe in the revelation which has come down to us and in that which came down to you. Our God and your God is One; and it is to Him we submit.

Quran (28.77) “But seek, with the (wealth) which Allah has bestowed on thee, the Home of the Hereafter, nor forget thy portion in this world: but do thou good, as Allah has been good to thee, and seek not (occasions for) mischief in the land: for Allah loves not those who do mischief.”

Quran (60.8) Allah forbids you not, with regard to those who fight you not for (your) Faith nor drive you out of your homes, from dealing kindly and justly with them: for Allah loveth those who are just.

Quran (5.8) O ye who believe! stand out firmly for Allah, as witnesses to fair dealing, and let not the hatred of others to you make you swerve to wrong and depart from justice. Be just: that is next to piety: and fear Allah. For Allah is well-acquainted with all that ye do.

(2.136) Say ye: “We believe in Allah, and the revelation given to us, and to Abraham, Ismail, Isaac, Jacob, and the Tribes, and that given to Moses and Jesus, and that given to (all) prophets from their Lord: We make no difference between one and another of them: And we submit to Allah (in Islam).

Quran (3.70) Ye People of the Book! Why reject ye the Signs of Allah, of which ye are (yourselves) witnesses?

Quran (3.71) Ye People of the Book! Why do ye clothe truth with falsehood, and conceal the truth, while ye have knowledge. Continue reading

Sahih Muslim (7 Vol. Set)

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Imam Muslim
Language: ِArabic-English | Format: PDF | Volumes: 7 | Size: 57 MB

Sahih Muslim is the most authentic book of Hadith after Sahih Al-Bukhari and contains 7,563 Ahadith. The Muslim Scholars have agreed that all of the Ahadith in Sahih Muslim are authentic. Thus, Darussalam realized the great benefit of publishing the full version of Sahih Muslim in the English language in the best presentation. Much care has been taken in rendering these Ahadith into a clear and simple style of modern English.

This fine-quality edition of Sahih Muslim has been verified by Dar-us-Salam Publications extensively. Its translation has been checked several times as not only to avoid mistranslating but also to avoid misinterpreting the ahadith as done by many translators of the current times in order to rush the product to market or to their lack of understanding of the Arabic language. Unlike other publishers which leave you wondering about the meaning of the ahadith, the unclear wording has been explained in the brackets. There are also footnotes on bottom of some of the pages, when the term cannot be explained in the brackets. This edition of Dar-us-Salam is nice in that it starts off by drawing a life sketch of Imam Muslim. Then, it goes on to the introduction of Sahih Muslim by Imam Muslim himself where he explains the difference between different narrators and level of trustworthiness.

This edition is also different from other publishers in that the text is side by side with Arabic so you have access to both English and Arabic at the same time. Furthermore, the book regarding reporting from the trustworthy narrators have been placed first while other books follow it. Moreover, the Arabic text contains full chain of narrators while the English only mentions the companion. Lastly, in keeping with the tradition of high quality printing, this edition of Sahih Muslim by Dar-us-Salam Publications is second to none other & made to last a long time, Insha Allah.

About Sahih Muslim:

The authentic hadith collections of Bukhari and Muslim are excellent in respect to both chain of transmissions and the texts as well as their general utility in that they gave guidance in almost all walks of life. The collections won the praise and acclaim of of Hadith scholars so much that they themselves produced works containing the same Ahadith as found in the collection of both Bukhari and Muslim but with their own independent chains consisting of a lesser # of sub-narrators and called their works Mustakhraj.

Imam Muslim is one of the foremost preservers of ahadith of the Prophet. His book comes second only to Sahih al Bukhari in terms of authenticity according to majority of scholars. It is considered to be better than Sahih Bukhari in terms of organization and repetition according to some scholars of Islam. It is the second in the collection of 6 books called “Sihah Sittah” or “6 most authentic books”. Imam Muslim took painstaking efforts in preserving the words/actions/sayings & approvals of the Prophet. He has mostly used 4-5 narrators in the chain of transmission although there are a couple of hadith containing 3 narrators. Imam Muslim was a very good student of Imam Bukhari and some of his Shuyukhs, although he did not narrate from Imam Bukhari too much, thus reducing the # of narrators. Continue reading

The Key To Understanding Islam

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Abdul-Rahman Bin Abdul-karim Al-Sheha
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 110 | Size: 52.5 MB

While the way of life known as Islam continues as the world’s most populace religion—the traditional undercounting of Muslims by western statisticians notwithstanding—the availability of useful Islamic information that speaks to the needs of both practicing Muslims as well as interested others has struggled to keep pace with the expanding community. Ironically, the post-9/11 frenzy that has gripped western societies with an uncommon and often irrational loathing for global Islam has, simultaneously, piqued the interest of more inquisitive, pensive non-Muslim westerners whose skepticism of mass media accounts of predatory Islamic “extremists” and “America haters” doesn’t match with their personal experiences of the Muslims they encounter in their neighborhoods, in their classrooms, or on their jobs.

Consequently, they seek the truth of the religion and strike out on their own to find answers to questions that are either ignored in the popular media, or are given the familiar “spin” that underwrites misinformation. What results is an informational void that cries out for a meaningful, serious response.

Abdul-Rahman al-Sheha, in his groundbreaking compendium The Key to Understanding Islam has not only addressed this need, but has introduced a uniquely constructed format that is as “user friendly” as it is comprehensive and scholarly.

The Islamic revival that accompanied Muslim’s throwing off the yoke of colonialism in the mid-20th century did not suffer from a dearth of scholars or scholarship aimed at consolidating new found freedoms within the divine Mercy of the Book of Allah and the traditions of His Noble Prophet. Indeed, the genius of these early Muslim sages helped to re-construct the framework that houses today’s resurgent Islamic movements. But many if not all of these definitive Islamic treatises are written in a language and style that appeal to those who, for the most part, are either already Muslim, or are comfortable conversing in dense, scholarly terms. Al-Sheha’s Key, in one simply written volume, offers a wealth of information that is, at once, revelatory for the non-Muslim who seeks a clear and concise understanding of what IS, and what IS NOT Islam, while providing a supremely well-organized inventory of traditionally sourced overviews on faith, worship, and social issues for the practicing Muslim. Clearly, this approach to dispensing critical informationon the life-affirming message of Islam presents a fresh and wholly inviting opportunity for presenting Islam while maintaining, immutably, the pristine principles of the Faith.

The Key to Understanding Islam combines the insightful, knowledgeable eye of the scholar with the empathy of a socially conscious researcher.

The result is an informative, compelling narrative that treats, for example, the essentials of Muslim worship, and the Islamic interpretation of astrophysics, al-Haitham, and Edwin Hubble, with equal clarity and aplomb, and importantly, connects them all together with appropriate references from the Qur’an, Prophetic traditions, or both. The breadth and depth of the subject covered is truly remarkable, and stands as a testimony to the enormous talent and sagacity of the author.

In its content, its style, its singularly important contribution to the global dialogue on religion in contemporary life, al-Sheha’s The Key to Understanding Islam takes its place among the most important works of its kind; it redefines the contours of this discussion while establishing improved methods for illuminating the Islamic underpinnings of European science and culture. It is a truly seminal work that will hopefully influence the next generation of Muslim scholars who choose to sow the fallow fields of presenting Islam as their life’s work. We pray for the universal acceptance of this bounteous offering; and we pray Allah, the Almighty, the One, the Sublime, to imbue Muslims and avail non-Muslims of the guidance and the knowledge of the best in this world, and the Best in the Life to Come. Continue reading

Dialogue Between An Atheist Professor And A Muslim Student

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Islamic Invitation website, www.islamic-invitation.com
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 15 | Size: 9 MB

This is a very interesting dialogue between an atheist professor and a Muslim student regarding some principles in Islamic belief. The student succeeded in refuting wrong believes spreading all over the world through proving the Islamic belief based on irrefutable evidences. He discussed in detailed the issue of Allah’s existence. Continue reading

Al-Ghurabah In Light Of Ash-Shaam

Ustadh Uthman Lateef

Who are the Ghurabah (Strangers)?

Amidst the current crisis in Syria, who are the Ghurabah?

How can we aid those who are suffering?

How can we become amongst the Ghurabah?

The Prophet SAW said “Islam began as something strange, and it will return as something strange the way it began. So Tooba for the Strangers”. Continue reading

Tears Of Blood (Massacre Of Muslims In Burma)

Alyas Karmani

Many Muslims and non Muslims alike are unaware of what exactly is going on in Burma (Myanmar) or even who the Burmese Muslims are.

This lecture covers a brief history of the Burmese Muslims and there current situation.

Who are the Burmese Muslims and why has the world turned a blind eye to them?

Why is the western media not coving the situation of Burma (Myanmar)?

What is our duty as Muslims towards the people of burma and how can we help them? Continue reading

Respond To The Suspicion Of Hijab And The Clothes Of The Muslim Woman

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Ali Al-Gudairi
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 22 | Size: 3 MB

1-Hijab in Islam

Many Westerners think that hijab (veil) is the symbol of oppression of the Muslim woman. Several western caricaturists depict the Muslim woman typically as one wearing a black «aba›a» : a dress that covers all her body except for her eyes. She is usually fat and sad! The aim behind this is usually to criticize such costume and confirm the image of the oppressed Muslim woman in the western minds! We refuted that image in a previous article «Arabs and Women Slavery» in which we mentioned the reaction of Saudi female students to the comments of Karen Hughes, the Middle East emissary of the American Administration, and how they proved their love of their Islamic costume and hijab. They were proud and had no intention to give this up. However, is hijab an Islamic innovation?

2-Hijab was an Old Jewish Custom

Although Muslim women are the ones that mostly observe the hijab, it is not correct that Islam is the only religion that orders its followers to wear hijab! Laila Lia Bruner, professor of Jewish history at the Jewish University and the visiting professor at Shiva University Institute for Adult Studies indicates that, «the early divine classic literature, Talmud and Midrash, had completely different viewpoints regarding covering woman’s hair. At that time, covering hair was not just a costume or a habit as in the Bible. Rather, it was the rule and regulation for pious women. The later divine literature of the middle ages asserted that issue as a complementary part of Jewish religious rituals.» (1) Hijab, then, was a habit and then a religious obligation on the Jewish woman. The Talmud Encyclopedia asserts this through comparing the opinion of the «mishna», the main source of rabbinic Judaism, and that of the Talmud regarding hijab:

«It seems that the mishna considered covering the hair as a Jewish habit despite that Talmud had already set a Torah rule for that and stated it as an obligation. Moreover, it is interesting that the term ‹dat yahudit› is used only for the behavior of women so that many defined the term as related to women›s modesty in particular.» (2)

Whether covering hair was a Jewish habit or a religious obligation, it is an established fact that was known and widespread in old Jewish societies.

In his book The Jewish Woman in Rabbinic Literature, Rabbi Dr. Menachem M. Brayer, Professor of Biblical Literature at Yeshiva University, indicates that it was the habit of Jewish women to go in public with the head cover which covered at time the whole face except for one eye. (3) He quotes the words of some old famous Rabbis as saying, «it is not the habit of the girls of Israel to go with bare head», «damned be the man who let his wife›s hair to be seen … The woman who keeps her hair bare brings poverty.» The divine law prohibits the recitation of blessings or prayers in the presence of a married woman whose hair is not covered. This is considered as «nakedness»(4). Professor Brier adds that, «during the period of Tanitic the failure of woman to cover her hair was considered as a humiliation of her modesty. She was fined four hundred «zeuzem» for that (zeuzem was about a quarter of a shekel)». He indicates as well that the hijab of the Jewish woman was not always a sign of modesty; at times it was an indication of distinction and luxury for noble women. It also symbolized the non-attainment of the married woman as being a sacred ownership of her husband. (5) Hijab also symbolized self-respect of the woman and he social status. Women of the lower classes used to wear hijab to give the impression that they were of a higher class. Hijab, in fact, was an indication of the noble class and this was the reason prostitutes were prevented from covering their hair in old Jewish society. However, prostitutes often wore a special scarf to look respectable. (6) Continue reading