What You Should Do In The Following Situations…

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Sheikh Muhammad Salih Al-Munajjid
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 45 | Size: 1 MB

Praise be to Allaah, the Lord of the Worlds, and peace and blessings be upon the most noble of the Prophets and Messengers, our Prophet Muhammad, and upon all his family and companions.

The Muslim may be faced with a number of emergency situations in his life, where he needs an immediate answer as to how he should act in that particular situation. In most cases, however, it is not possible to look for or ask about the appropriate Islamic rulings at that time.

This proves the importance of learning about Islam and knowing the rules of sharee’ah, so that when a Muslim needs this information, he will have it at hand and will thus be able to save himself or his Muslim brother from doing something haraam or making a mistake. In so many cases, ignorance can lead to corruption of worship or – at the very least – acute embarrassment. It is unfortunate that an imaam may mistakenly stand up for a fifth rak’ah, and there may be nobody in the congregation or the mosque who knows what the rulings of sharee’ah say should be done in such a situation. Or a traveller who is intending to perform ‘umrah may come to the airport at the last minute, and suddenly discover that he has forgotten his ihraam garments, but he has no time to do anything about it, and there is nobody among the Muslim in the airport who can tell him what he should do in this emergency. Or a man may come to the mosque on an occasion when the prayers have been joined together because of rain: the congregation is already praying ‘ishaa’ but he has not yet prayed maghrib, so he is confused as to what he should do. In such a situation the people may embark upon a debate based only on ignorance, and so confusion will reign in the mosques. In many individual and personal matters, ignorance may lead to embarrassment and even sin, especially when a person is in the position of having to make a decision and he does not have sufficient knowledge on which to base that decision.

People in this world have prepared information telling people how to behave in emergency situations: what to do if fire breaks out, if someone is drowning, if a scorpion bites, if there is a car accident, if someone is bleeding or has broken a bone… All of these first aid procedures are well known; they teach them to people and hold special courses. How much more important is it, then, that those who are concerned with the Hereafter should learn and teach the rules of this religion!

At this point, we should note the importance of differentiating between hypothetical matters which rarely, if ever, happen, and matters which we know from experience do happen to people and are asked about.

With regard to the first type (hypothetical situations), asking about them is a fruitless waste of time, which is not allowed in Islam. The Prophet SAWS (peace and blessings of Allah be upon him) warned us against this when he said: “Accept what I have left you with, for the people who came before you were only destroyed because of their excessive questioning and their disputing with their Prophets…” (Reported by al-Bukhaari and Muslim; this version was reported by Muslim, no. 1337, vol. 2, p. 975)

Commenting on this hadeeth, Ibn Rajab (may Allah have mercy on him) said: “These ahaadeeth indicate that it is forbidden to ask questions unnecessarily… or to ask questions out of stubbornness or an intention to mock.” (Jaami’ al-‘Uloom wa’l-Hukm by Ibn Rajab, 1/240, edited by al-Arna’oot)

This is how we interpret the words of a group of the salaf, such as the report that when Zayd ibn Thaabit, may Allah be pleased with him, was asked about something, he would say, “Has it really happened?” If they said “No,” he would tell them, “Leave it until it really happens.” (Reported by Ibn Rajab, op. cit., 1/245; see also similar reports in Sunan al-Daarimi, 1/49, and Jaami Bayaan al-‘Ilm by Ibn ‘Abd al-Barr, 2/174).

With regard to the second type, matters that really happen, then it is good to ask about them. The Companions of the Prophet SAWS (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) sometimes asked him about things before they happened, but it was so that they could act accordingly when these things did happen. For example, they asked him: “We are going to meet with the enemy tomorrow, and we do not have knives, so should we use dried sugar canes as weapons?” They asked him about the rulers who he had told them would come after him, and whether they should obey them or fight them. Hudhayfah asked him about al-fitan (times of tribulation) and what he should do at such times. (Jaami’ al-‘Uloom al-Hukm, 1/243). This indicates that it is permissible to ask about things which are expected to happen.

There follows a discussion about some issues that people are likely to face in real life. These are practical matters which have happened and could happen to some people. In each case, the answer is accompanied by a reference to the sources in the work of trustworthy scholars. There may be differing opinions in some cases, but the answer has been limited to one viewpoint, the one based on the soundest evidence, for the sake of brevity and ease of understanding. I ask Allah to benefit me and my brothers in Islam in this world and on the Day of Judgement. May He reward with good all those who share in this endeavour, for He is the Most Kind and Generous. Allah knows best. Continue reading

An Introduction To The Science Of Hadith

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Dr. Suhaib Hasan
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 42 | Size: 1 MB

The Muslims are agreed that the Sunnah of the Prophet Muhammad (S) is the second of the two revealed fundamental sources of Islam, after the Glorious Qur’an. The authentic Sunnah is contained within the vast body of Hadith literature.

A hadith (pl. ahadith) is composed of two parts: the matn (text) and the isnad (chain of reporters). A text may seem to be logical and reasonable but it needs an authentic isnad with reliable reporters to be acceptable; ‘Abdullah bin Al-Mubarak (d. 181 AH), one of the illustrious teachers of Imam al-Bukhari, said:

“The isnad is part of the religion: had it not been for the isnad, whoever wished to would have said whatever he liked.”

During the lifetime of the Prophet (S) and after his death, his Companions (Sahabah) used to refer to him directly, when quoting his saying. The Successors (Tabi’un) followed suit; some of them used to quote the Prophet (S) through the Companions while others would omit the intermediate authority – such a hadith was .later known as mursal. It was found that the missing link between the Successor and the Prophet (S) might be one person, i.e. a Companion, or two people, the extra person being an older Successor who heard the hadith from the Companion. This is an example of how the need for the verification of each isnad arose. Imam Malik (d. 179) said, “The first one to utilize the isnad was Ibn Shihab al Zuhri” (d. 124). The other more important reason was the deliberate fabrication of ahadith by various sects which appeared amongst the Muslims, in order to support their views (see later, under discussion of maudu’ ahadith). Ibn Sirin (d. 110), a Successor, said, “They would not ask about the isnad: But when the fitnah (trouble, turmoil, esp. civil war) happened, they said: Name to us your men. So the narrations of the Ahl al¬Sunnah (Adherents to the Sunnah) would be accepted, while those of the Ahl al-Bid ‘ah (Adherents to Innovation) would not be accepted. ” Continue reading

A Description Of The Wudhu’ Of The Prophet (PBUH)

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Dawood Burbank
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 26 | Size: 1 MB

I desired to write this as a completion for the treatises which are in circulation amongst the people today – about the different fields – especially of worship such as Prayer and Fasting, etc. – which have made easier that which is difficult as regards religious rulings and being guided thereby, as it maybe difficult these days for some to read, research and extract these rulings from their places within the source books – either because of the ignorance of the Muslims or laziness or other worldly problems. I sincerely advise all the Muslims to read and research until they come to know and understand their true Deen – and I wished to write this in order to complete the series of the types of worship, especially since no one has particularized this topic in a treatise – except what occurs within the books of reference as we have explained – but I have not found this in the form of a treatise.

My method for this treatise has been not to quote except what is authentic from the hadeeth of Rasoolullah (sallallaahu ‘alaihi wa sallam) – if Allaah wishes – ordering it according to the order of the Wudoo of Rasoolullah (sallallaahu ‘alaihi wa sallam), and I have commented on some of the points about which there is difference of opinion – stating that which is correct therefrom in our view after replying to the other opinions.

I ask Allaah to guide us to that which is proper – verily He is the One having authority over that and having the Power to do so. Continue reading

The Purity

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AbdulRahman Bin Abdulkarim Al-Sheha
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 60 | Size: 1 MB

Praise be to Allah! may Allah’s blessing and peace be upon our Prophet Muhammad, his family and Companions. Purity (Tahârah) is a beautiful word that is pleasing to the eye, and a quality which everyone wishes to maintain. From an Islamic perspective, purity has a general meaning. Thus it may mean, on one hand, physical cleanliness which is the purity (of the body) from perceptible filth or ritual purification. On the other hand, it may mean spiritual purity which is the purity of the self from vices, sins and abandoning disobediences, and getting used to good deeds and words. This comprehensive meaning of purity is expressed in the words of Prophet Muhammad, (PBUH) (This symbol means “may Allah send His blessing and peace upon him”), as reported by Abu Hurairah, (may Allah be pleased with him):

“What do you think if there was a river at the door of one of you in which he bathes five times a day: Does this leave any dirt on him?’ They answered, ‘Nothing is left.’ The Prophet (PBUH) said, ‘That is like the five prayers with which Allah remove sins.” (Bukhari & Muslim)

Ritual purity is a prerequisite to prayer (Şalât); this comprises either ablution (wudu’) for minor impurity or ceremonial bath (ghusl) for major impurity. If a Muslim purifies himself in accordance with Allah’s commandments and the Prophet’s instructions, his prayer will purify him of sins. Islam is the religion of both outward and inward purity. Allah’s Messenger (PBUH) warned those who neglected physical purity which is considered a prerequisite for validity of certain devotions, like prayer, touching or holding the Holy Qur’an, etc. Ibn ‘Abbass reported Allah’s Messenger’s words when he passed by two graves:

“They are being punished for some- thing which seemed trivial to them: this one used not to clean himself of urine; whereas the other was used to tale bearing.” Then he requested a wet branch which he split into two half and put a half on either grave, then said, “With that, punishment will be reduced unless they (the branches) become dry.” (Bukhari & Muslim)

Training his companions to love purity, he used to say the following supplication:

“O Allah! Praise be to You as much as that which fills the heavens and the earth and as much as You will. O Allah! Purify me with snow, hail and  cool water. O Allah! Purify me of sins as a white dress is purified of dirt.” (Ahmad)

The teachings of Islam urge cleanliness. Jâbir narrated that Allah’s Messenger (PBUH) once came to them and saw a man with shaggy hair. He said,

“Couldn’t he find something to tidy his hair up?” When he saw another man with dirty clothes, he said, “Couldn’t this man find water to clean his dress?” (Ahmad ,Nasai and Abu Daud) Continue reading