The History Of The Khalifahs Who Took The Right Way

Jalalu’d-Din ‘Abd’ur-Rahman as -Suyuti
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 244 | Size: 20 MB

Umar ibn al-Khattab

from The History of the Khalifahs by Jalal ad-Din as-Suyuti

Umar ibn al-Khattab ibn Nufayl ibn ‘Abdu’l-‘Uzza ibn Riyah ibn Qart ibn Razah ibn ‘Adi ibn Ka‘b ibn Lu’ayy, Amir al-Mu’minin, Abu Hafs, al-Qurashi, al-‘Adawi, al-Faruq.

He accepted Islam in the sixth year of prophecy when he was twenty-seven years old, says adh-Dhahabi.

An-Nawawi says: ‘Umar was born thirteen years after the Elephant, he was one of the nobility of Quraysh, and he had the role of ambassador in the Jahiliyyah; Quraysh, whenever war broke out among them or between them and others, would send him as an ambassador, i.e. a messenger, and when someone called them to judgement – often over a matter of standing or lineage – then they sent him as a response to that.

He accepted Islam very early on, after forty other men and eleven women. Some say that it was after thirty-nine men and twenty-three women, and some say, after forty-five men and eleven women. But it was only after he accepted Islam that Islam was shown openly in Makkah and the Muslims rejoiced in him.

He said: He was one of the outstripping first ones, one of the ten for whom it was witnessed that they were for the Garden, one of the khulafa’ who took the right way, one of the in-laws of the Prophet, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, one of the great men of knowledge of the Companions and one of their abstinent people.

There are related from him five hundred and thirty-nine hadith from the Prophet, may Allah bless him and grant him peace. ‘Uthman ibn ‘Affan narrated from him, ‘Ali (ibn Abi Talib), Talhah (ibn ‘Ubaydullah), Sa‘d (ibn Abi Waqqas), ‘Abd ar-Rahman ibn ‘Awf, Ibn Mas‘ud, Abu Dharr, ‘Amr ibn ‘Abasah and his son ‘Abdullah, Ibn ‘Abbas, Ibn az-Zubayr, Anas, Abu Hurayrah, ‘Amr ibn al-‘As, Abu Musa al-Ash‘ari, al-Bara’ ibn ‘Azib, Abu Sa‘id al-Khudri, and a great number of the Companions and others, may Allah be pleased with them.

I say: I attach here some sections in which there are some collections of interest connected to his biography.

The reports on his acceptance of Islam

At-Tirmidhi narrated that Ibn ‘Umar narrated that: The Prophet, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, said, ‘O Allah, strengthen Islam with whoever is more beloved to You of these two men: ‘Umar ibn al-Khattab or Abu Jahl ibn Hisham.’ At-Tabarani narrated this from hadith of Ibn Mas‘ud and Anas, may Allah be pleased with them.

Al-Hakim narrated that Ibn ‘Abbas related that the Prophet, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, said, ‘O Allah, strengthen Islam by ‘Umar ibn al-Khattab especially.’ At-Tabarani narrated this in the Awsat from a hadith of Abu Bakr as-Siddiq and in the Kabir from hadith of Thawban.

Ahmad narrated that ‘Umar said: I went out to confront the Messenger of Allah, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, and found that he had preceded me to the mosque (of Makkah). I stood behind him and he began by reciting Suratu’l-Haqqah. I was astonished by the composition of the Qur’an, so I said, ‘By Allah, this is a poet as Quraysh say.’ Then he recited, ‘It is truly the saying of a noble messenger, and it is not the saying of a poet, how little you believe…’ (Qur’an 69: 40) to the end of the ayah, and Islam came about in my heart.

Ibn Abi Jabir narrated that Jabir said: The beginning of ‘Umar’s Islam was that ‘Umar said, ‘My sister’s time to give birth came to her at night so I went out of the house, and entered the precincts of the Ka‘bah. Then the Prophet, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, came and entered the Hijr (the low-walled, semi-circular area to one end of the Ka‘bah) and on him there were two rough cloths. He prayed to Allah as much as Allah willed, then he turned away and I heard something the like of which I had not heard. He went out and I followed him and he said, “Who is this?” I said, “‘Umar.” He said, “‘Umar, will you not leave me alone, either by night or by day?” I became afraid that he might supplicate against me, so I said, “I witness that there is no god but Allah and that you are the Messenger of Allah.” He said, “‘Umar, keep it secret.” I said, “No, by the One Who sent you with the truth, I will openly declare it just as I openly declared idolatry.”’

Ibn Sa‘d, Abu Ya‘la, al-Hakim, and al-Bayhaqi in ad-Dala’il, narrated that Anas, may Allah be pleased with him, said: ‘Umar went out wearing his sword, and a man from Bani Zuhrah met him and said, ‘Where do you intend going, ‘Umar?’ He said, ‘I want to kill Muhammad.’ He said, ‘How will you be safe from Bani Hashim and Bani Zuhrah if you have killed Muhammad?’ He said, ‘I can only believe that you have converted.’ He said, ‘Shall I show you something astonishing; your brother-in-law and your sister have converted and abandoned your deen.’ ‘Umar walked on and came to the two of them while Khabbab was with them. When he heard the sound of ‘Umar he hid in the house, and then he (‘Umar) entered and said, ‘What is this murmur of lowered voices?’ They had been reciting Taha. They said, ‘Nothing but some conversation which we were holding.’ He said, ‘Perhaps you two have converted?’ His brother-in-law said to him, ‘‘Umar, what if the truth were outside of your deen?’ So ‘Umar leapt upon him and struck him severely. His sister came to push him away from her husband and he struck her a blow with his hand so that her face bled. Then she said, and she was angry, ‘And if the truth were outside of your deen? I witness that there is no god but Allah and that Muhammad is His slave and His Messenger.’ ‘Umar said, ‘Give me the writing which you have and I will read it,’ – and ‘Umar used to read. His sister said to him, ‘You are dirty, and no-one reads it but the purified (so stand and bathe yourself or perform wudu’).’ He stood and performed wudu’, then he took the writing and read Taha until it came to, ‘Truly I, I am Allah there is no god except Me, so worship Me and establish the prayer for My remembrance.’ (Qur’an 20: 14). ‘Umar said, ‘Show me the way to Muhammad.’ When Khabbab heard the words of ‘Umar he came out and said, ‘Rejoice, ‘Umar! Because I hope that you are the (answer to the) supplication which the Messenger of Allah made for you on the night of Thursday, “O Allah, strengthen Islam with ‘Umar ibn al-Khattab or with ‘Amr ibn Hisham.”’ The Messenger of Allah, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, was in the lower part of the house which was at the foot of Safa and ‘Umar went off until he came to the house, at the door of which were Hamzah, Talhah and others. Hamzah said, ‘This is ‘Umar; If Allah wants good for him he will become a Muslim; and if He wishes other than that, then killing him will be a little thing for us.’ He said: And the Prophet, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, was inside receiving revelation. He came out when ‘Umar arrived, took hold of the folds of his clothes and the straps of his sword, and said, ‘You won’t give up, ‘Umar, until Allah visits you with disgrace and punishment like he did al-Walid ibn al-Mughirah.’ ‘Umar said, ‘I witness that there is no god but Allah and that you are the slave of Allah and His Messenger.’ Continue reading

The Key To Understanding Islam

Abdul-Rahman Bin Abdul-karim Al-Sheha
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 110 | Size: 52.5 MB

While the way of life known as Islam continues as the world’s most populace religion—the traditional undercounting of Muslims by western statisticians notwithstanding—the availability of useful Islamic information that speaks to the needs of both practicing Muslims as well as interested others has struggled to keep pace with the expanding community. Ironically, the post-9/11 frenzy that has gripped western societies with an uncommon and often irrational loathing for global Islam has, simultaneously, piqued the interest of more inquisitive, pensive non-Muslim westerners whose skepticism of mass media accounts of predatory Islamic “extremists” and “America haters” doesn’t match with their personal experiences of the Muslims they encounter in their neighborhoods, in their classrooms, or on their jobs.

Consequently, they seek the truth of the religion and strike out on their own to find answers to questions that are either ignored in the popular media, or are given the familiar “spin” that underwrites misinformation. What results is an informational void that cries out for a meaningful, serious response.

Abdul-Rahman al-Sheha, in his groundbreaking compendium The Key to Understanding Islam has not only addressed this need, but has introduced a uniquely constructed format that is as “user friendly” as it is comprehensive and scholarly.

The Islamic revival that accompanied Muslim’s throwing off the yoke of colonialism in the mid-20th century did not suffer from a dearth of scholars or scholarship aimed at consolidating new found freedoms within the divine Mercy of the Book of Allah and the traditions of His Noble Prophet. Indeed, the genius of these early Muslim sages helped to re-construct the framework that houses today’s resurgent Islamic movements. But many if not all of these definitive Islamic treatises are written in a language and style that appeal to those who, for the most part, are either already Muslim, or are comfortable conversing in dense, scholarly terms. Al-Sheha’s Key, in one simply written volume, offers a wealth of information that is, at once, revelatory for the non-Muslim who seeks a clear and concise understanding of what IS, and what IS NOT Islam, while providing a supremely well-organized inventory of traditionally sourced overviews on faith, worship, and social issues for the practicing Muslim. Clearly, this approach to dispensing critical informationon the life-affirming message of Islam presents a fresh and wholly inviting opportunity for presenting Islam while maintaining, immutably, the pristine principles of the Faith.

The Key to Understanding Islam combines the insightful, knowledgeable eye of the scholar with the empathy of a socially conscious researcher.

The result is an informative, compelling narrative that treats, for example, the essentials of Muslim worship, and the Islamic interpretation of astrophysics, al-Haitham, and Edwin Hubble, with equal clarity and aplomb, and importantly, connects them all together with appropriate references from the Qur’an, Prophetic traditions, or both. The breadth and depth of the subject covered is truly remarkable, and stands as a testimony to the enormous talent and sagacity of the author.

In its content, its style, its singularly important contribution to the global dialogue on religion in contemporary life, al-Sheha’s The Key to Understanding Islam takes its place among the most important works of its kind; it redefines the contours of this discussion while establishing improved methods for illuminating the Islamic underpinnings of European science and culture. It is a truly seminal work that will hopefully influence the next generation of Muslim scholars who choose to sow the fallow fields of presenting Islam as their life’s work. We pray for the universal acceptance of this bounteous offering; and we pray Allah, the Almighty, the One, the Sublime, to imbue Muslims and avail non-Muslims of the guidance and the knowledge of the best in this world, and the Best in the Life to Come. Continue reading

The Crusades Through Arab Eyes (Audio Book)

Amin Maalouf

European and Arab versions of the Crusades have little in common. For Arabs, the twelfth and thirteenth centuries were years of strenuous efforts to repel a brutal and destructive invasion by barbarian hordes. In “The Crusades Through Arab Eyes”, Amin Maalouf has sifted through the works of a score of contemporary Arab chroniclers of the Crusades, eyewitnesses and often participants in the events.

He retells their stories in their own vivacious style, giving us a vivid portrait of a society rent by internal conflicts, and shaken by a traumatic encounter with an alien culture. He retraces two critical centuries of Middle Eastern history, and offers fascinating insights into some of the forces that shape Arab and Islamic consciousness today.


‘A useful and important analysis adding much to existing western histories … worth recommending to George Bush.’ London Review of Books ‘Well-researched and highly readable.’ The Guardian ‘A wide readership should enjoy this vivid narrative of stirring events.’ The Bookseller ‘An inspiring story … Very readable … Well translated … Warmly recommended.’ The Times Literary Supplement ‘Very well done indeed … Should be put in the hands of anyone who asks what lies behind the Middle East’s present conflicts.’ Middle East International

About Author:

Amin Maalouf is a Lebanese writer and journalist. He is the author of bestselling books, including Leo Africanus, Samakand, On Identity and Ports of Call. He has lived in Paris since 1976. Continue reading

The Two Holy Mosques

Ministry of Islamic Affairs, Endowments, Da‘wah and Guidance
Language:  English | Format: PDF | Pages: 22 | Size: 11 MB

A brief book on the two Holy Mosques in Saudi Arabia, the Holy Mosque in Makkah is the most revered place of worship for Muslims around the world. At the center of the Mosque is the Ka’aba, which literally means ‘cube’ in Arabic. All Muslims are required to face in the direction of the Ka’aba five times every day when offering their prayers. The Prophet’s Mosque in Madinah is the second most revered place of worship for Muslims around the world. Millions of Muslims visit the Mosque each year, to worship, to visit the Prophet’s grave, and to see the city that gave birth to Islam. Continue reading

Vocabulary Of The Holy Qur’an (Arabic – English)

Dr. Abdullah Abbas Al-Nadwi
Language: Arabic – English | Format: PDF | Pages: 897 | Size: 66 MB

An extremely useful dictionary of the words in the Qur’an, compiled on the basis of their three-letter roots, allowing one to infer the meanings of almost all the different Qur’anic words by recognizing their root meaning. Examples of uses of the words in the Qur’an are also presented.

The vocabulary of the Quran. Qamus alfaz al-quran al Karim is a valuable asset for the scholars of the holy Quran. It meets a long felt need and fills the lacuna in this field. It is at once a dictionary of the words of the Quran and also a grammatical guide to their roots. It treats the words in their various verbal forms. Copious examples of the verses of the Quran are given. The aim of the respected compiler is that the book should be of advantage to the English speaking Muslims of the world who’s mother tongue is not Arabic. The compiler has consulted the reputed commentaries on the Quran. We do not find any other dictionary of comparable volume ad content. An appendix lists the roots of the word’s to facilitate those who are not aware of the Arabic etymological system of the words.

The Compiler Dr. Abdullah Abbas Al-Nadwi is a graduate of the Nadwatul Ulema and an MA &PhD in Linguistic Philosophy, He is advisor to the Rabitah al-Alam al-Islamiyyah, Makkah, Member of the Liguistic Society Cambride and Professor at Umm al-Qura University Makkah.

Allah swt says:

وَلَوۡ جَعَلۡنَـٰهُ قُرۡءَانًا أَعۡجَمِيًّ۬ا لَّقَالُواْ لَوۡلَا فُصِّلَتۡ ءَايَـٰتُهُ ۥۤ‌ۖ ءَا۠عۡجَمِىٌّ۬ وَعَرَبِىٌّ۬‌ۗ قُلۡ هُوَ لِلَّذِينَ ءَامَنُواْ هُدً۬ى وَشِفَآءٌ۬‌ۖ وَٱلَّذِينَ لَا يُؤۡمِنُونَ فِىٓ ءَاذَانِهِمۡ وَقۡرٌ۬ وَهُوَ عَلَيۡهِمۡ عَمًى‌ۚ أُوْلَـٰٓٮِٕكَ يُنَادَوۡنَ مِن مَّكَانِۭ بَعِيدٍ۬

(Had We sent this as a qur’an (in the language) other than arabic, they would have said: ‘Why are not its verses explained in detail? What! (a Book) not in arabic and (a Messenger an Arab?’ Say: ‘It is a Guide and a Healing to those who believe; and for those who believe not, there is a deafness in their ears, and it is blindness in their (eyes): They are (as it were) being called from a place far distant!) [TM Qur’an Fussilat 41:44]

And he swt also says:

إِنَّا جَعَلۡنَـٰهُ قُرۡءَٲنًا عَرَبِيًّ۬ا لَّعَلَّڪُمۡ تَعۡقِلُونَ

(We have made it a Qur’an in arabic, that you may be able to understand (and learn wisdom)) [TM Qur’an Az-Zukhruf  43:2] Continue reading

Learn The Language Of The Holy Qur’an

Dr. Abdullah Abbas Nadwi
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 431 | Size: 31 MB

A highly useful book on the grammar of the Arabic language as used in the Holy Qur’an. Spread across 30 chapters with lesson plans to assist the reader through-out.

The Lessons have been arranged in simple grammatic classification supported by verses of the Holy Qur’an as illustrations of the postulated rules in Phonology, Morphology and Syntax.

It is an attempt to assist those who wish to acquire proficiency in Arabic for the sake of understanding the Qur’an. Continue reading

Al-Qur’an: The Linguistic Miracle

Linguistic Miracle
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 150 | Size: 2 MB

In the first section of this Book, there is introduction of Classical Arabic (a more in-depth version of the language in comparison to the Modern Fus-ha Standard, Spoken Arabic aka MSA). I will explain the literary tools of Classical Arabic, with examples, and later near the end of this section, I will share a few gems of Classical Arabic language, to give you a feel of how the Classical Arabs expressed themselves through Poetry, and what powerful literary tools they used to convey their message to an equally praiseworthy literary audience. The second section will focus on discussing the subtleties of the Qur’anic text and its beauties, and will further give tips for students of Qur’anic and Arabic language to have the ability themselves to extract beautiful gems from the Qur’an.

Introduction to the Arabic Language:

The Arabic language is a unique language, and has many special and unique features which make it suitable for it to convey; many meanings in few words, subtleties, emphasis and powerful imagery through speech alone. If God was to convey a message to mankind, it would be through a language which is easy to learn, and has the highest form of expressiveness. I believe that Arabic is that language by which He communicated His final Message to mankind, and I will try to prove it through this Book – Qur’an, the Linguistic Miracle.

In the first section of this Book, I will be introducing Classical Arabic (a more in-depth version of the language in comparison to the Modern Fus-ha Standard, Spoken Arabic aka MSA). I will explain the literary tools of Classical Arabic, with examples, and later near the end of this section, I will share a few gems of Classical Arabic language, to give you a feel of how the Classical Arabs expressed themselves through Poetry, and what powerful literary tools they used to convey their message to an equally praiseworthy literary audience.

What is the Arabic language?

Arabic is an ancient Semitic language, believed to be over 2000 years old. So it has had alot of time to develop, and enrich its meanings and linguistic beauty. Some say it – the language- has been inspired and preserved miraculously in its pure form. It has stayed firm and pure to its roots, meaning that words and their meanings which were said over 1,400 years ago are still preserved and documented for us uptill this day. Unlike many other languages where words change meanings every few generations, and the meaning of the original word is lost. An example in the English language today is the word ‘wicked’ which meant ‘evil’ last generation, but in this generation it means ‘good.’ It may be that 2 generations ahead, ‘wicked’ may only be recognized as meaning ‘good’, possibly making future readers of the language confused.

How is Arabic Structured?

Arabic works with a triliteral root system, which means that most words are made of 3 Root Consonant letters, and other 1 and 2 letter words with different meanings surrounding that word. It is then for the reader to use his knowledge of the language to separate and distinguish between the letters to understand which letter means what.

This will be explained later in the book, and is a fun part of learning the language. (Almost like connecting a jigsaw puzzle.)

How does Arabic language work?

Arabic 3 Consonant lettered words are usually ‘Descriptions’. These Descriptions will then fit into Contexts for Objects.

For example; the word ‘sayyaarah’ means ‘Car’. But in reality, it comes from the root meaning of the 3 Root Letters: Siin-Ya-Ra (s-y-r) = Meaning: ‘Travelling through Movement.’

We therefore see that other words like i.e. ‘he went for a walk’ (saara), or “siiyrah” (a walk through a journey), which have similar Root letters have similar meanings, simply due to their Root letters being the same. This makes it extremely easy to know what a word means in Arabic, because you might see a long difficult word, but you break it down to look at its root 3 letters – and voila! You know what root meaning and description is being hinted at. This allows you to visualize the picture being portrayed through the Arabic.

This root system is also found partially in other languages, but Arabic sustains this rule throughout its entire language consistently, which makes its richness even more exciting to explore.

What makes it even more exciting is that the Arabic language has one of the richest sets of Vocabularies in the world, probably more than any other language. (For example: the Arabs have over 1000 words just for describing the Camel, and over 60 different words for Love!) And the amazing bit is – every word has its own shade of meaning, so two words could be similar, but they both would have a slightly different implication in meaning. Continue reading

A Comparison Between Islam, Christianity And Judaism And The Choice Between Them

Muhammad Al-Sayed Muhammad
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 208 | Size: 1.5 MB

All praises are due to Allah Lord of the worlds, Originator of the heavens and the Earth, the Creator of darkness and light, I testify that there is no deity worthy of worship except Allah alone without ascribing any partners to him, the Protector of the believers and the One who guides them to the straight path. I testify that Muhammad peace and blessings of Allah be upon him is his slave and messenger. O’ Allah send your peace and blessing upon Muhammad the Prophet and seal of the Prophets and Messengers, who was sent with the illumination, he delivered the trust and admonished his nation and Allah wiped away all of the darkness, and peace and blessings be upon his wives and his purified household and his blessed companions, who gave him victory and all those who were guided from his guidance, and emulated his way, and followed his traditions till the Day of Judgment.

As to what follows:

In the recent past especially since the advent of the satellite T.V channel, there has been a stark increase in the attacks on the religion of God, Islam, the aim is simply to lead people astray from it.

It has manifested itself in spite of the increased number of people accepting Islam around the world. They are systematically exploiting peoples ignorance about Islam and perpetually poisoning.

Therefore with the will and grace of Allah in this treatise a comparative study of Islam Christianity and Judaism, with particular attention to their creeds respectively.

This will clarify for us the authentic from the unreliable, the acceptable and the unacceptable, so that the objective reader can decide with certainty between the three faiths.

To begin with I plea to all parties be they; Muslim Christian or Jew to free themselves from partisanship and their desires when choosing what is more deserving to be followed, as this decision will be a proof against them on the Day of Judgment, in front of Allah. So it is important at the beginning that one takes a moment with oneself being absolutely truthful with oneself and Allah in the sincere search for the truth, before a day where neither money nor offspring with assist them, except a man who will go to Allah with a sound heart.

I ask Allah to guide us all to the truth that has no doubt, and that he expand our chest and that he enables us to tread upon the path of truth, His path, until the day we meet him indeed he is the One who is capable of doing it.

Who are “The People of The Book”?

The term The People of The Book in brief refer to the Christians and the Jews who were recipients of the “heavenly religions” respectively.

There is little doubt that these faiths had been altered and have deviated from their original course, and by doing so were no longer within the guidance that God Almighty had chosen for human kind.

What ties the Christians to the Jews and what are the similarities between the two?

Before looking furthers one must note that the Christians and the Jews are in opposition of one another and have severe enmity between them and so unifying them is impossible.

One of the main causes for these irreconcilable differences is their differing creeds, as the Christians believe in the divinity of Christ and say that he is one of three in the trinity, claiming that he was crucified and killed on the cross at the hands of the Jews, he was then resurrected from the dead and raised to heaven.

On the contrary the Jews in turn completely deny the prophet-hood of Jesus claiming that he was illegitimately born out of wedlock, and are condescending of his mother.

The points of contention between the two are numerous but the point indicated above is sufficient to show that brining together these two faiths is an impossible task.

Despite the efforts of the world media to show Christianity and Judaism in a good light as partners of one another and with a mutual agreement between the two, the truth could not be further away, and this is only a veneer that they both are content with in order to demonise and attack Islam, which is a commonality between the two.

The truth behind the façade is the following:

The Jews are convinced that if they rebuild the structure of Solomon then their Saviour will emerge and he is the Messiah Dajjal (the anti-Christ) as is foretold in their scripture.

And in that fact is a testimony to the Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) who said; “ the Dajjal (anti-Christ) with be followed by 70,000 of the Jews of Asafhaan who will be wearing the Tayaalisah” or clothes of their religious men” One may ask if this is the number of their clergymen what is the number of their congregation.

Their belief having rejected the prophet hood of Jesus are waiting for their saviour who was mentioned in their scripture who will subjugate the people of the Earth for them, what is even more shocking is that the Anti-Christ who will be believed in by the Jews as their saviour, will be blind in one eye and have a human body and will finite and definable, i.e. in a particular place, which is something not attributable to Almighty God who is not encompassed in a place like the Messiah of the Jews.

As for the Christians:

Then their belief revolves around the fact that if the Anti-Christ emerges then that would signal the beginning of a new era for the Christians who will again rule the
Earth from Jerusalem. So the Christians consider the Jews a stepping-stone to eventual world domination.

This is why they the Christians are anxious that if the Muslims were to be victorious against the Jews this would delay the decent of Christ.

So it is clear the reason why the West and particularly the U.N is obsessed with supporting the state of Israel even when they have established a country on stolen land.

So from what has been clarified the veneer of peace between the Christians and Jews is one built on mutual benefits for both of them and yet there lies a deep resentment and enmity between the two that can result in any moment spilling in to war, if recent history is anything to go by. Continue reading

In The Shade Of The Qur’an – Fi Dhilal Al Qur’an – Sayyid Qutb (18 Volumes)

Sayyid Qutb
Language: English | Format: PDF | Volumes: 18 | Size: 236 MB

Ever since its revelation 1400 years ago, the Qur’an has been a book of guidance and inspiration, a reference point, and a rich source of social and moral dynamism for hundreds of millions of people throughout the world who believe it to be immutable word of God. Hardly a generation passes without a fresh attempt to unravel the meanings of the Qur’an and gain deeper insight into its universal message within a contemporary perspective.

In The Shade Of The Qur’an is more than ‘just another’ commentary; yet it is not too over-reaching or outlandish to be a completely new interpretation. It is an earnest, sincere and sober look at man’s contemporary achievements and difficulties in the light of the message of the Qur’an. It is an effort to vigorously explore its rich wisdom, and expand its invaluable guidance for the benefit of an increasingly ’sophisticated’ , yet highly perplexed modern society.

The work, which is by far Sayyid Qutb’s largest and most profound, spans the whole of the text of the Qur’an. It was written, and partly re-written, over a period of more than 15 years, most of which the author had spent in Egyptian prisons, during the 1950s and 1960s. In it is embedded Sayyid Qutb’s insight, highly esteemed intellectual vigor, and his widely-acclaimed literary prowess.

In The Shade Of The Qur’an has been universally recognized as an outstanding contribution to Islamic thought and scholarship, to which students and scholars, as well as contemporary Islamic revivalist movements all over the world, owe a great deal. Now that it is available in English, it will continue to enlighten and inspire millions more. It will take its rightful place as an indispensable work of reference for a proper understanding of contemporary Islamic thinking. Continue reading

A Word For Word Meaning Of The Qur’an (3 Volume Set)

Muhammad Mohar Ali
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 2148 | Size: 204 MB

This set places one or a couple of words of the ‘ayah in one line of a column and gives their meanings side by side in another column, taking care to see that the flow and intelligibility of the English meanings are not thereby lost. This method enables the reader to identify which English words or phrases represent the meaning of which words in the Arabic text. It has the additional advantage of keeping the meaning strictly to the wording of the text or importing in the meaning any word or expression that has no correspondence with anything in the text.

To further facilitate the understanding of the text, the meanings of almost all important words in the text have been given separately. To do this a number has been placed on the English word which represents the meaning of the particular word in the text and then the meanings of that word have been given under that number in another column by the side of the general meaning of the text. The numbering has been kept individual for each page. Also grammatical notes, particularly verb forms and verbal nouns, have been given as far as possible. As the words recur at different pages, so their meanings and grammatical notes also have been repeated, giving cross reference to at least one previous occurrence of the word, indicating the page on which and the number under which the word has been explained before. The aim has been to enable a non-Arab reader to understand the Qur’an as well as to improve his knowledge of Arabic, particularly the Qur’anic Arabic. Continue reading