The Sunnah And Its Role In Islamic Legislation

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Dr. Mustafa as-Siba’ee
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 573 | Size: 16 MB

The Sunnah and its Role in Islamic Legislation is a groundbreaking effort by Dr. Mustafa as-Siba’ee, for it has a completeness to it in two regards: first, the author manages to cover all topics related to the Sunnah—its status, its legislative force, the stages that led to its recording, just to mention a few—in a comprehensive and organized manner. Second, he presents the views of those that have attacked the Sunnah throughout history, detailing their arguments and then refuting them. Among those groups from the past were the Shi’a and the Mu’tazilah; today, they are mainly the Orientalists and those that are influenced by them.

Shaykh as-Siba’ee takes us through the historical development of the Sunnah, from the early stages of revelation to the recording of the Sunnah during the era of the great Imams of Hadith. Throughout that account, he highlights the contributions of the scholars in preserving the Sunnah and cleansing it from fabrications and lies. Shaykh as-Siba’ee gives a clear account of the revolutionary methods and scholarly principles that were established in order to authenticate historical reports and narrations. The author shows us that the fruits of that endeavor were the preservation of the authentic Sunnah and the birth of the Hadith sciences.

This book has been a perennial source of knowledge for Arabic-speaking students of Islam, for its clarity, readability, and insightful research. New English-speaking students too have available to them this authoritative treatise on the Sunnah of our beloved Prophet Muhammad ) may the peace and blessings of Allah be upon him)

About Author

Dr. Mustafa As-Siba’i was born in 1915 in the city of Hams, Damascus. He memorized the Qur’an at a very young age. He studied the Islamic Sciences with his father Shaykh Hasani Sibai and in circles with great scholars and jurists of Hams. His teachers included Shaykh Tahir Al-Atasi (Mufti of Hams at the time), Shaykh Zahid Al-Atasi, Shaykh Muhammad Al-Yasin, Shaykh Anis Kalalib and others.

From the young age of eighteen he used to deliver the Friday khutbahs in the absence of his father. In 1933, he went to Egypt and enrolled at the Univesity of Al-Azhar to study fiqh.

Upon completing his studies of fiqh, he enrolled at the Usul al-Deen Faculty of Al-Azhar and excelled in his studies. In 1949, he completed his PhD on the theme of ‘The Position of Sunnah in Legislation’.
He is currently Dean of Faculty of Islamic Jurisprudence, and professor of Individual Rights in the Faculty of Sharia, Damascus University. Continue reading

Sahih Al-Bukhari (9 Vol. Set)

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Imam al-Bukhari
Language: ِArabic-English | Format: PDF | Volumes: 9 | Size: 80 MB

Generally regarded as the single most authentic collection of Ahadith, Sahih Al-Bukhari covers almost all aspects of life in providing proper guidance from the messenger of Allah. This 9-Volume Bukhari is the work of over 16 years by Imam Bukhari who before writing any Hadith in this book performed two Rakat prayer of guidance from Allah and when he was sure of the Hadith’s authenticity, he wrote it in the book. Tremendous amounts of errors exist in the translations by other translators. To eliminate the problem Dar-us-Salam spent over 3 years in the publication of this book and presented a book which is translated into English in a very easy & simple language, so that all readers can understand it without difficulty.

This is the unabridged version consisting of 7563 ahadith (about 4000 pages) which are presented neatly in smaller books format and printed on fine paper. Each book (subtopics in each volume categorized by very broad topics such as the Book of As-Salat) contains many chapters which represent one logical unit of Ahadith. Each book contains anywhere from one to 150 chapters with each chapter containing several Ahadith. This book will be a great addition to your library while giving you a true perspective on the traditions of the Prophet (PBUH).

In Imam Bukhari’s ‘Al-Jami-al-Sahih’ (Sahih Al Bukhari) the Imam had recorded all the Sayings of the Prophet which he found to be genuine after thorough examination and scrutiny. He spent sixteen years in research and examined more than sixty thousand Sayings from which he selected only sayings whose genuineness and accuracy he established beyond the slightest doubt. Deducting duplicates, the Imam’s collection contain about four thousand distinct Sayings. Continue reading

The Key To Understanding Islam

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Abdul-Rahman Bin Abdul-karim Al-Sheha
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 110 | Size: 52.5 MB

While the way of life known as Islam continues as the world’s most populace religion—the traditional undercounting of Muslims by western statisticians notwithstanding—the availability of useful Islamic information that speaks to the needs of both practicing Muslims as well as interested others has struggled to keep pace with the expanding community. Ironically, the post-9/11 frenzy that has gripped western societies with an uncommon and often irrational loathing for global Islam has, simultaneously, piqued the interest of more inquisitive, pensive non-Muslim westerners whose skepticism of mass media accounts of predatory Islamic “extremists” and “America haters” doesn’t match with their personal experiences of the Muslims they encounter in their neighborhoods, in their classrooms, or on their jobs.

Consequently, they seek the truth of the religion and strike out on their own to find answers to questions that are either ignored in the popular media, or are given the familiar “spin” that underwrites misinformation. What results is an informational void that cries out for a meaningful, serious response.

Abdul-Rahman al-Sheha, in his groundbreaking compendium The Key to Understanding Islam has not only addressed this need, but has introduced a uniquely constructed format that is as “user friendly” as it is comprehensive and scholarly.

The Islamic revival that accompanied Muslim’s throwing off the yoke of colonialism in the mid-20th century did not suffer from a dearth of scholars or scholarship aimed at consolidating new found freedoms within the divine Mercy of the Book of Allah and the traditions of His Noble Prophet. Indeed, the genius of these early Muslim sages helped to re-construct the framework that houses today’s resurgent Islamic movements. But many if not all of these definitive Islamic treatises are written in a language and style that appeal to those who, for the most part, are either already Muslim, or are comfortable conversing in dense, scholarly terms. Al-Sheha’s Key, in one simply written volume, offers a wealth of information that is, at once, revelatory for the non-Muslim who seeks a clear and concise understanding of what IS, and what IS NOT Islam, while providing a supremely well-organized inventory of traditionally sourced overviews on faith, worship, and social issues for the practicing Muslim. Clearly, this approach to dispensing critical informationon the life-affirming message of Islam presents a fresh and wholly inviting opportunity for presenting Islam while maintaining, immutably, the pristine principles of the Faith.

The Key to Understanding Islam combines the insightful, knowledgeable eye of the scholar with the empathy of a socially conscious researcher.

The result is an informative, compelling narrative that treats, for example, the essentials of Muslim worship, and the Islamic interpretation of astrophysics, al-Haitham, and Edwin Hubble, with equal clarity and aplomb, and importantly, connects them all together with appropriate references from the Qur’an, Prophetic traditions, or both. The breadth and depth of the subject covered is truly remarkable, and stands as a testimony to the enormous talent and sagacity of the author.

In its content, its style, its singularly important contribution to the global dialogue on religion in contemporary life, al-Sheha’s The Key to Understanding Islam takes its place among the most important works of its kind; it redefines the contours of this discussion while establishing improved methods for illuminating the Islamic underpinnings of European science and culture. It is a truly seminal work that will hopefully influence the next generation of Muslim scholars who choose to sow the fallow fields of presenting Islam as their life’s work. We pray for the universal acceptance of this bounteous offering; and we pray Allah, the Almighty, the One, the Sublime, to imbue Muslims and avail non-Muslims of the guidance and the knowledge of the best in this world, and the Best in the Life to Come. Continue reading

The Clash Of Civilizations: An Islamic View

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Dr. Abu Ameenah Bilal Philips
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 158 | Size: 5 MB

In a time when Muslims in the West live in an environment of turmoil and difficulty facing new challenges daily, they encounter a cultural dilemma, a clash of the Islamic and Western civilisations. Therefore, it is of the utmost importance to know the foundations of these cultures, the differences between them as well as understanding islam correctly taken from its pure sources. In this book, the author highlights these aspects of the two cultures whilst also giving a detailed explanation of the core beliefs of Islam.

Abu Ameenah Bilal Philips was born in Jamaica, but grew up in Canada, where he accepted Islam in 1972. He completed a diploma in Arabic, and a B.A. from the College of Islamic Disciplines (Usool Ad-Deen) at the Islamic Univeristy of Madeenah in 1979. At the University of Riyadh, College of Education, he completed a M.A. in Islamic Theology in 1985, and in the department of Islamic Studies at the University of Wales, he completed a Ph.D. in Islamic Theology in 1994. Since 1994 he has founded and directed the Islamic Information Center in Dubai, United Arab Emirates (which is now known as Discover Islam) and the Foreign Literature Department of Dar Al Fatah Islamic Press in Sharjah, UAE. Presently, he is a lecturer of Arabic and Islamic Studies at the American University in Dubai and Ajman University in Ajman, UAE. Continue reading

The Rights Of Non-Muslims In The Islamic World

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Salih ibn Husain Al-‘Ayid
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 81 | Size: 24 MB

In this study titled The Rights of non-Muslims in the Islamic World, to discuss this issue in depth, so that non-Muslims can know what Islam guarantees them, and not go to extremes in making demands that have no basis in truth. At the same time, Muslims can learn about the rights of others, and not oppress them by denying them some or all of their rights. Continue reading

Importance Of Ethics And Values In Islamic Civilization

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Ragib Al-Sarjani
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 103 | Size: 5 MB

Human rights in Islamic civilization

Introduction

Western philosopher Nietzsche says: «The weak and failures should perish: first principle of our love of humanity. And they should be helped to do this»[1]! But the philosophy of Islam and its law have never deviated from the values and ethics, which were represented in a set of rights that included all human beings without distinction between colors, races or languages, and also included the human behavior in dealing with each other. These values and ethics were also represented in maintaining and applying these rights with the authority of Islamic law and imposing sanctions upon offenders.

Islam’s view for humans

Islam treats man with honor and esteem out of Allah›s saying: {We have honored the sons of Adam; provided them with transport on land and sea; given them for sustenance things good and pure; and conferred on them special favors, above a great part of our creation.}[Al-Isra: 70]. This view gives special characteristics and features for human rights in Islam. The most important feature is the comprehensiveness of these rights.These rights include political, economic, social and intellectual rights. They are also common for Muslims and non-Muslims without distinction between colors, races or languages. They are not subject to cancellation or change, as they are linked to the teachings of the Lord of the worlds.

The Messenger of Allah (peace be upon him) reported this in his farewell address, which was a comprehensive report on human rights, as he said: «… No doubt, your blood and your properties are sacred to one another like the sanctity of this day of yours, in this month of yours, in this town of yours, till the day you meet your Lord..[2]». This prophetic address asserted a set of rights, the most important of which is the sanctity of blood, money, honor, and others.

The Prophet (peace be upon him) also magnified the human psyche in general, preserving its greatest right, namely the right to life. Asked about great sins, he (peace be upon him) said: «Polytheism and killing a soul…[3]». The word soul was generalized to include any soul killed without right.

The Prophet (peace be upon him) went further as he ordered man to preserve his own life by prohibiting suicide. He (peace be upon him) said: «Whoever purposely throws himself from a mountain and kills himself, will be in the (Hell) Fire falling down into it and abiding therein perpetually forever; and whoever drinks poison and kills himself with it, he will be carrying his poison in his hand and drinking it in the (Hell) Fire wherein he will abide eternally forever; and whoever kills himself with an iron weapon, will be carrying that weapon in his hand and stabbing his abdomen with it in the (Hell) Fire wherein he will abide eternally forever.»[4]

Islam prohibits any action that diminishes the right to life, whether through intimidation, insult, or beating. Hisham ibn Hakim said he heard the Messenger of Allah (peace be upon him saying: «Allah would torment those who torment people in the world.»[5]

Equality among people

After honoring man in general and stipulating the sanctity of blood, honor and money, and the right to life, the Prophet (peace be upon him) emphasized the right of equality among all people; between individuals and groups, between races and peoples, between rulers and the ruled, and between governors and the governed. So, there are no restrictions or exceptions; no difference in legislation between Arabs and non-Arabs, or between white and black, or between rulers and the ruled. Rather, people are differentiated according to piety. He (peace be upon him) said: «O people! Verily your Lord is one and your father is one. All of you belong to one ancestry of Adam, and Adam was created out of clay. Verily the noblest among you in Allah›s view is he who is the most pious. There is no superiority for an Arab over a non-Arab except in piety.»[6]Let›s look at how the Prophet handled the principle of equality in order to realize his greatness. Abu Umamah reported: Abu Dhar taunted Bilal about his mother and said: You son of a black woman. Bilal went to the Messenger of Allah (peace be upon him) and told him the story. The Prophet got angry. Abu Dhar came and did not know what happened. The Prophet turned his face away from Abu Dhar. Abu Dhar said: There should be something that made you turn your face away from me. The Prophet said: «Are you taunting Bilal about his mother?»and then said: «By the One Who revealed the book to Muhammad – or any other oath he wanted, God willing – one is not preferred to another except by work. You are all equal.»[7]

Justice in Islam

Another right is linked to the right to equality, namely the right to justice. One of the masterpieces in this regard is the Prophet›s saying to Usama ibn Zayd when the latter wanted to intercede for the Makhzumi woman who had committed theft: «By Allah, if Fatima, daughter of Muhammad, were to steal, I would have her hand cut off.»[8]

The Prophet (peace be upon him) also banned the confiscation of one›s right to self-defense in order to observe justice. He says: «… no doubt, for he (the creditor) has the right to demand his debt (harshly)….»[9]. He says to those who take over governance and judiciary: «…When two litigants sit in front of you, do not decide till you hear what the other has to say as you heard what the first had to say; for it is best that you should have a clear idea of the best decision.»[10]

Right to sufficiency in Islam

The right to sufficiency is a unique right stipulated in the Islamic law. It was not stipulated in any positive system or a human rights charter before. The right to sufficiency means that everyone shall live within the confines of the Islamic state on the adequate needs of life, on condition that he shall lead a decent life, having appropriate standards of living. This right is different from the bare subsistence level stipulated in positive systems, which means the minimum limit that maintains life.[11]

The right to sufficiency is achieved through work. If one is unable to do this, Zakat (alms) can do it; and if Zakat is unable to pay to the poor, the state budget shall pay. The Prophet (peace be upon him) expressed this when he said: «…he who left behind property that is for his family, and he who dies under debt or leaves children (in helplessness), the responsibility (of paying his debt and bringing up his children) lies on me.»[1212]He asserted this right when he said: «The one who sleeps with a full stomach knowing that his neighbor is hungry doesn’t believe in me.»[13]Lauding Ash›arites, he (peace be upon him) said: «When the Ash›arites run short of provisions in the campaigns or run short of food for their children in Medina they collect whatever is with them in the cloth and then partake equally from one vessel. They are from me and I am from them.»[14] Continue reading

Islamic Exorcism From Qur’an And Sunnah

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The United Kingdom
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 21 | Size: 18.5 MB

This booklet presents a number of supplications and shows how a Muslim can treat himself with verses From the Qur’an and from the Prophetic supplications (ruqyah) against some diseases, sorcery, the evil eye, and other ailments. Continue reading

Smoking: An Islamic Perspective

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An Islamic centre of Qatar
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 12 | Size: 1 MB

Smoking is a modern day catastrophe. It is harmful in all aspects, for it is a waste of money, an unnecessary destruction of health and it can disturb the social balance of the family. The smoker breathes harm with every cigarette he lights, because both nicotine and tar mix with his blood which ultimately poisons his health  and life. Smoking is the quickest way to contract various diseases, some of which include cardiac disease, respiratory problems, and lung cancer.

Historical Notes:

Tobacco derived from Tubago, which is an island in the Gulf of Mexico where this plant was found. It was carried to Spain then to Europe.It was introduced to the Muslim world intentionally by tobacco companies, who encouraged its spread together with all types of in toxic ants. Nowadays smoking is decreasing in the industrial countries while it is highly increasing in the poor developing countries.

Modern Statistics:

It is reported by the World Health Organization that: At least a million people die annually prematurely‘ all over the world of the 50% adults in the developing countries smoke tobacco. Smoking and chewing tobacco lead to 90% of lung cancer cases 75% of atherosclerosis and 25% of heart diseases. In America approximately 84% of laryngeal cancer patients were smokers Mouth cancers were 13 times more common in smokers Researchers proved that smokers might have 65 times the chance of contracting lung cancer than non-smokers Cancer of the esophagus was 11.5 times more common in smokers than others The newborn babies of smoking mothers are weaker and weighed 200 grams less in weight.

The view upon smoking within Islam:

«Tobacco is a foul thing. » Dr. Yusuf Al Qaradawi in his book «The Lawful and Prohibited In Islam.»

A general rule of the Islamic Shari’ah is that it is haram for the Muslim to eat or drink any thing which may cause his death, either quickly or gradually, such as poisons or substances which are injurious to health or harmful to his body. It is also haram to eat or drink large quantities of a substance if large quantities of it cause illness For the Muslim is not entirely his own master; he is also an asset to his religion and his community, and his life,health wealth and all that Allah has bestowed upon him are a trust with him which he is not permitted to diminish Allah says:

«And do not kill yourselves; indeed, Allah is ever Merciful to you.» (4,29)

He also says:

«And do not be cast into ruin by your own hands …» (2, 195)

And His Messenger (peace be on him) said:

« Do not harm yourself or others.»

As an application of this principle, we may say that if it is proved that the use of tobacco is in injurious to health it is prohibited especially for a person whose physician has advised him to stop smoking. Even if it is not injurious, to health it is still a waste of money, spent neither for religious nor for secular benefit and the Prophet (peace be on him) forbade wasting of wealth This becomes the more serious when the money is otherwise needed for the sustenance of oneself or one’s family.

Help your loved ones stop smoking:

A fifth of the world’s population is Muslim, and most Muslims live in areas where the prevalence of smoking is high and increasing by the day. According to statistics, it is estimated that out of the five million people who die due to smoking related causes every year, one million are Muslims. Yet, thanks to media influences and advertising, which erroneously portray smoking as part of a glamorous lifestyle, many Muslims, both men and women, are prompted to take to the habit themselves. In response to the growing trend, health and religious authorities across the world have launched anti-smoking drives, to deter people and raise awareness of the harmful effects of smoking. Besides the mandatory health warning on cigarette packets, it has been proposed that the pack should carry graphic images of the diseases that can be contracted by smoking, to drive the point home to smokers.

In another official initiative, many cities and public places around the world have designated areas as «non-smoking», to make it difficult for people to smoke. Recently the holy cities of Makkah and Madeenah have been declared no-smoking zones, and smoking or even selling cigarettes has been made a punishable offence there.

Similarly, mosques and religious leaders across the world have taken it upon themselves to educate people about the harmful effects of smoking, which is considered a prohibited act in Islam. The Qur’an says (what means):

“…make not your own hands contribute to your destruction” (2, 195)

“…nor kill or destroy yourselves” (4, 29) Continue reading

Al-Ahkam As-Sultaniyyah: The Laws Of Islamic Governance

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Abu’l Hasan al-Mawardi
Language: English | Format: PDF | Pages: 386 | Size: 6 MB

Al-Ahkam as-Sultaniyyah written in the fith Century Hijri is perhaps the single most comprehensive account of the workings of Islamic governance and equally a highly influential theoretical outline of the nature of that governance.

Woven throughout it are accounts of the first community of Islam and the judgements of the early scholars of the salaf which are the book’s lifeblood and its light.

Covering all the various aspects of the deen of Islam which are the concern and responsibility of the Khalifah, his amirs, his wazirs (ministers) and deputies. The rights and duties of these persons are expounded in detail.

The Author

Abu al-Hasan Ali Ibn Muhammad Ibn Habib al-Mawardi was born at Basrah. He learned Fiqh (Islamic jurisprudence) from the jurist Abu al-Wahid al-Simari. He then went to Baghdad for advanced studies under Sheikh Abd al-Hamid and Abdallah al-Baqi.
His proficiency in jurisprudence Ethics, Political science and literature proved useful in securing a respectable career for him. After his initial appointment as Qadi (Judge), he was gradually promoted to higher offices, till he became the Chief Justice at Baghdad. The Abbasid Caliph al-Qaim bi Amr Allah appointed him as his roving ambassador and sent him to a number of countries as the head of special missions. In this capacity he played a key role in establishing harmonious relations between the declining Abbasid Caliphate and the rising powers of Buwahids and Seljukes.

He was favoured with rich gifts and tributes by most Sultans of the time. He was still in Baghdad when it was taken over by Buwahids. Al-Mawardi died in 450 AH (1058 AD)

The Translator

Dr. Asadullah Yate studied at the University of Cambridge and received his doctorate (PHd) in 1987. He has studied with teacher Shaykh Abdal Qadir al-Murabit as-Sufi and has translated, on his behalf, books such as The Secret Garden of Shaykh Mahmud Shabistari, and is presently engaged in a translation from Arabic of the Kitab al-Mufeed of Shaykh asch-Shinqeeti and Necip Fazil’s Ulu Hakan from Turkish. One of his recent books is Ibn Rushd – Mujtahid of Europa. Continue reading